Rent Control, the United States 1946

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Juscafe_com_Rent_Control_the_United_States_1946

Rent Control, the United States 1946

In the United States, rent control refers to laws or ordinances that put price limitations on residential housing rents to serve as a price ceiling. Economists agree that rent regulation reduces the quality and quantity of rental housing units available.

  • Rent control, in a broader sense, refers to two forms of price controls: “tight price ceilings,” sometimes known as “rent freeze” systems, and “absolute” or “first generation” rent controls, which allow no rent rises at all (rent is typically frozen at the rate existing when the law was enacted).
  • “Vacancy control,” also known as “strict” or “strong” rent control, in which the rental price can rise during a tenancy but remains regulated between tenancies (a new tenant pays nearly the same rent as the previous tenant), and
  • “vacancy decontrol,” also known as “tenancy” or “second-generation” rent control, in which the rental price can rise during a tenancy but rents can rise to market rate between tenancies (a new tenant pays nearly the same rent as the previous tenant (new tenants pay market rate rent, but increases are limited as long as they remain).

As of 2019, there are communities in five states (California, New York, New Jersey, Maryland, and Oregon) and the District of Columbia that have some sort of residential rent control (for normal structures, excluding mobile homes). Thirty-seven states prohibit or preclude rent control, whereas eight states enable cities to impose rent control but do not have any cities that have done so.

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The Nuremberg Trials Germany 1945

The Nuremberg Trials Germany 1945
The Nuremberg Trials Germany 1945 – Reichsmarschall and Luftwaffe Commander Hermann G ring at trial in Nuremberg, 1946.

The Nuremberg Trials Germany 1945

The Nürnberg trials, commonly known as the Nuremberg trials, were a series of war crimes proceedings held at Nürnberg, Germany, in 1945–46. Former Nazi officials were accused and tried as war criminals by the International Military Tribunal. The four counts in the indictment were: (1) crimes against peace (i.e., planning, initiating, and waging wars of aggression in violation of international treaties and agreements), (2) crimes against humanity (i.e., exterminations, deportations, and genocide), (3) war crimes (i.e., violations of the laws of war), and (4) “a common plan or conspiracy to commit” the crimes listed in the first three counts.

The London Agreement on August 8, 1945 gave the International Military Tribunal the authority to conduct these cases. On that date, representatives from the United States, the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, and France’s provisional government signed an agreement that included a charter for an international military tribunal to try major Axis war criminals whose crimes were not limited to a specific geographic location. The contents of this agreement were later ratified by 19 other countries.

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The Servicemen’s Readjustment Act 1944

The Servicemen’s Readjustment Act 1944
The Servicemen’s Readjustment Act 1944 – President Roosevelt signs the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944 into law.

The Servicemen’s Readjustment Act, G.I. Bill 1944

This act, often known as the GI Bill, was signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on June 22, 1944, and gave payments to veterans of World War II for college education, unemployment insurance, and housing.

While World War II was still being waged, the Department of Labor predicted that 15 million men and women who had served in the military would be unemployed after the war. To prevent widespread unemployment from causing postwar depression, the National Resources Planning Board, a White House department, began studying postwar labor needs in 1942 and recommended a series of education and training initiatives in June 1943.

The fundamental components of what became the Serviceman’s Readjustment Act were created by the American Legion and pushed through Congress. In the spring of 1944, the bill was unanimously passed by both chambers of Congress. It was signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on June 22, 1944, just days after the D-day invasion of Normandy.

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Internment of Japanese Americans 1942

Internment of Japanese Americans 1942
Internment of Japanese Americans 1942

Internment of Japanese Americans 1942

Japanese American internment was the forcible displacement of thousands of Japanese Americans to internment camps by the United States government during World War II. That action marked the end of the federal government’s lengthy history of racist and discriminatory treatment of Asian immigrants and their descendants, which began in the late 1800s with restrictive immigration laws.

Despite a lack of strong evidence, the US War Department suspected Japanese Americans of acting as saboteurs or espionage operatives when the Japanese planes attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Some politicians advocated gathering up Japanese Americans, particularly those living along the West Coast, and incarcerating them inland. The US Department of Justice, which opposed transporting innocent citizens, and the War Department, which favored imprisonment, engaged in a power struggle.

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