The Geneva Convention 1864, Henry Dunant

The Geneva Convention 1864

The Geneva Convention 1864
The Geneva Convention 1864

Jean-Henri Dunant (1828–1910)

The Geneva Convention was a series of international diplomatic meetings that resulted in a number of agreements, including the Humanitarian Law of Armed Conflicts, a set of international laws that govern the treatment of wounded or captured military personnel, medical personnel, and non-military civilians during wars and armed conflicts. The agreements were first signed in 1864 and extensively modified after World War II in 1949.

Dunant, Henry

The basic principles of battle were hit-or-miss for much of humanity’s history, assuming they existed at all. While some civilizations showed sympathy for the ill, helpless, or innocent populations, others tortured or slaughtered anybody who came into contact with them, with no questions asked.

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The Emancipation Proclamation 1863

The Emancipation Proclamation 1863

The Emancipation Proclamation 1863
The Emancipation Proclamation – An 1890 lithograph depicting the historic proclamation.

On January 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, as the country entered its third year of deadly civil war. “All people kept as slaves” within the insurgent states “are, and henceforth shall be free,” the declaration said.

Despite its broad language, the Emancipation Proclamation had significant limitations. It only applied to states that had seceded from the US, leaving slavery in the loyal border states unaffected. It also specifically omitted areas of the Confederacy (the Southern separatist states) that had already been taken over by the North. Above all, the independence it guaranteed was contingent on Union (US) military success.

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The Government Printing Office 1861

The Government Printing Office 1861

The Government Printing Office 1861
The Government Printing Office typesetting room, c. 1910.

Joint Resolution No. 25, James Buchanan (1791–1868)

The United States Government Printing Office (GPO) was established by Congress in June 1860 and commenced operations on March 4, 1861, with 350 workers. Since its establishment, GPO has occupied the corner of North Capitol and H Streets, and it has continued to use the most efficient and cost-effective manufacturing processes to deliver genuine and secure government papers and goods to the American people.

On June 23, 1860, President James Buchanan signed Joint Resolution No. 25 authorizing the establishment of the GPO. On the same day that President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated, the agency opened its doors on March 4, 1861.

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The Dred Scott Decision 1857

The Dred Scott Decision 1857

The Dred Scott Decision 1857
The Dred Scott Decision 1857 – Dred Scott, c. 1857.

Dred Scott (c. 1800–1858), Harriet Robinson (c. 1815–1876), Irene Emerson (1815–1903), Roger Taney (1777–1864)

The question of whether slavery would be tolerated in new territory has posed a danger to the Union since the 1780s. Many sacrifices have been made throughout the years to avoid disunity. But, what does the Constitution say about this? In the case of DRED SCOTT VS. SANDFORD, this topic was presented before the Supreme Court in 1857. DRED SCOTT was a slave of John Emerson, an army surgeon. In the 1830s, Scott was transferred from Missouri to positions in Illinois and what is now Minnesota for a period of time before returning to Missouri. The Missouri Compromise of 1820 designated the territory around MINNESOTA to be a free state.

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The Measure of Contract Damages 1854

The Measure of Contract Damages 1854

The Measure of Contract Damages 1854
The Measure of Contract Damages 1854 – A dispute over the broken crankshaft of a steam engine resulted in the rule of foreseeability that is now used to determine the measure of damages from a breach of contract.

Hadley v. Baxendale case

A brief summary of the facts. Plaintiffs owned and ran a mill, and when a component of their steam engine failed, they had to shut it down. Plaintiffs then hired Defendants, who were common carriers, to transport the component to W. Joyce & Co. for a replacement part to be made. Plaintiffs sought to collect damages when delivery was delayed owing to Defendants’ negligence, leading Plaintiffs’ mill to stay closed for longer than intended.

A summary of the Rule of Law. Damages flowing naturally from the breach or those in the reasonable comprehension of the parties at the time of contracting are those to which a nonbreaching party is entitled.

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International Migration Law, V. Chetail

Book – International Migration Law – V. Chetail

International Migration Law - Vincent Chetail
International Migration Law – Vincent Chetail

Migration has been taken over by mass panic. Newspapers, television, radio, and social media all include stories on migration. It now dominates headlines to the point that no one can avoid hearing about migration on a daily basis.

The volume of information the public is exposed to in quantitative terms is not the primary determinant of migration’s pervasiveness. It’s also nourished by the sort of information delivered and the way it’s depicted in the media.

Migrants are frequently presented in terrifying and emotive terms as an uncontrollable mass inflow that threatens national values, identity, and security. ‘The international dread of terror has overlapped and entwined with the fear of illegal migration as a result of this effervescence.’ This familiar chant warns us that the rich West is under assault, and that the hordes are approaching.’

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Top Law Scholarships to study in Europe

Top Law Scholarships to study in Europe

Top Law Scholarships to study in Europe
Top Law Scholarships to study in Europe

To study in Germany:

  • DAAD Master’s Scholarships for Public Policy and Good Governance (PPGG) – Postgraduate scholarships for students from countries in Africa, Latin America, South Asia, Southeast Asia and the Middle East, to undertake a master’s degree in public policy at a participating German university. Applicants should have studied a related undergraduate degree (e.g. law, economics or politics) and should intend to use their qualification within their country of origin.

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