The Displaced Persons Act 1948

The Displaced Persons Act 1948
The Displaced Persons Act 1948

The Displaced Persons Act 1948

On June 25, 1948, Harry S. Truman marked the Displaced Persons Act of 1948. In its most fundamental sense, the demonstration would aid the resettlement of thousands of European outcasts (to a great extent through allowing American visas) who had been dislodged from their nations of origin because of World War II.

While the demonstration at the same time offered help to evacuees, it put severe cutoff points on the quantity of individuals who could enter the U.S. by considering any individual ineligible for an American visa who had entered an exile camp after December 22, 1945. This apparently erratic limitation really disallowed the entry of Jewish outcasts who endure the Holocaust, however when confronted with slaughters in post bellum Poland, escaped to local Germany after December 22.

Read more

Universal Declaration of Human Rights 1948

Universal Declaration of Human Rights 1948
Universal Declaration of Human Rights 1948

Universal Declaration of Human Rights 1948

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone in the history of human rights. Declarations written by representatives of diverse legal and cultural backgrounds from all parts of the world were declared by the United Nations General Assembly held in Paris on 10 December 1948 (General Assembly Resolution 217 A). ..

All countries. It established for the first time that basic human rights must be universally protected and translated into more than 500 languages. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights is now widely recognized as an inspiration and precursor to the adoption of more than 70 permanently valid human rights treaties at the global and regional levels (all of which include references to them in the preamble).

Read more

The Hollywood Ten Case 1948

The Hollywood Ten Case 1948
The Hollywood Ten Case 1948

The Hollywood Ten Case 1948

Hollywood Divided Into Two Camps, The Right To Remain Silent, “I Would Hate Myself In The Morning”

Defendants: Alvah Bessie, Herbert Biberman, Lester Cole, Edward Dmytryk, Ring Lardner, Jr., John Howard Lawson, Albert Maltz, Sam Ornitz, Robert Adrian Scott, and Dalton Trumbo
Crime Charged: Contempt of Congress
Chief Defense Lawyers: Bartley Crum, Charles J. Katz, Robert W. Kenny, and Martin Popper
Chief Prosecutor: William Hitz
Judges: Edward M. Curran, Richmond B. Keech, and David A. Pine
Place: Washington, D.C.
Dates of Trials: April 12-19, 1948 (Lawson); May 3-5, 1948 (Trumbo); June 22-29, 1950 (Biberman, Cole, Dmytryk, Lardner, and Scott); June 23-29, 1950 (Bessie, Maltz, and Ornitz)
Verdicts: Guilty
Sentences: 1 year imprisonment and $1,000 fine (Bessie, Cole, Lardner, Lawson, Maltz, Ornitz, Scott, and Trumbo); 6 months and $500 fine (Biberman, and Dmytryk)

Read more

The U.N. Convention on Genocide 1948

The U.N. Convention on Genocide 1948
The U.N. Convention on Genocide 1948

The U.N. Convention on Genocide 1948

Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, 9 December 1948.

The Genocide Convention was one of the first UN treaties dealing with humanitarian issues. Adopted in 1948 in response to the atrocities committed during World War II, G.A. In Resolution 180 (II) of 21 December 1947, the United Nations acknowledges that “genocide is an international crime with domestic and international responsibility for individuals and nations.” Since then, the treaty has been widely accepted by the international community and ratified by the overwhelming majority of countries.

Read more

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 1948

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 1948
General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 1948

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 1948

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). This is a series of multilateral trade agreements aimed at eliminating tariffs between Parties and reducing tariffs. When the 23 Geneva countries signed the GATT in 1947 (effective January 1, 1948), it was considered a tentative agreement until the UN agency replaced GATT. When no such institution emerged, GATT was expanded and further developed in several consecutive negotiations.

It then proved to be the most effective means of liberalising world trade and played an important role in the large-scale expansion of world trade in the second half of the 20th century. When GATT was replaced by the World Trade Organization (WTO) in 1995, 125 countries signed the agreement. It has become a code of conduct governing 90 percent of world trade.

Read more

Colonialism and Postwar Independence 1947

Colonialism and Postwar Independence 1947
Colonialism and Postwar Independence 1947 – Belvedere House in Kolkata (formerly Calcutta), India, once served as the official residence of the
viceroys of India. Today it houses the National Library of India.

Colonialism and Postwar Independence 1947

Between 1945 and 1960, three dozen new states in Asia and Africa gained autonomy or complete independence from European colonists.
British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan Helps Start Decolonisation

There was no decolonisation process. In some areas it was peaceful and orderly. In many other regions, independence was achieved only after a protracted revolution. Some new and independent countries received a stable government almost immediately. Others have been dominated by dictators and juntas for decades, or have experienced long-term civil wars. Some European governments have welcomed new relationships with former colonies. Others fought militarily against decolonisation. The process of decolonisation was in line with the new Cold War between the Soviet Union and the United States and the early development of the new United Nations. Decolonisation was often influenced by the competition of superpowers and had a clear impact on the development of that competition. It has also changed the pattern of international affairs more generally.

Read more

The Protection of Trademarks 1946

The Protection of Trademarks 1946
The Protection of Trademarks 1946

The Protection of Trademarks 1946

Overview
Congress passed the Lanham Act, 15 U.S.C. 1051 et seq., in 1946. The Act establishes a national trademark registration system and protects the owner of a federally registered mark from the use of similar marks if the use is likely to cause consumer confusion or dilution of a well-known mark.

Eligibility for a Trademark
A trademark must meet two basic characteristics to be eligible for protection: it must be in use in commerce and it must be unique.

Read more