The Social Security Act 1935

The Social Security Act 1935
The Social Security Act 1935

The Social Security Act 1935

The Social Security Act, which went into effect on August 14, 1935, provided a system of old-age benefits for workers, as well as payments for victims of industrial accidents, unemployment insurance, and assistance for dependent mothers and children, the blind, and the physically handicapped.

Prior to the 1930s, elderly care was mostly a municipal, state, and family affair (with the exception of veterans’ pensions). The immense hardship caused by the Great Depression, on the other hand, sparked popular support for a national old-age insurance scheme. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt issued a message to Congress on January 17, 1935, requesting “social security” legislation.

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The Nuremberg Laws 1935

The Nuremberg Laws 1935
The Nuremberg Laws 1935

The Nuremberg Laws 1935 – 15 September 1935

The Nuremberg Race Laws are passed by the German parliament (Reichstag).

The Reich Citizenship Law and the Law for the Protection of German Blood and German Honor were the two pieces of legislation that made up the Nuremberg Race Laws. Both regulations were passed during a special session of the Nazi-controlled Reichstag in Nuremberg, Germany. Many of the racial theories that underlay Nazi ideology were formalized through these laws, which also provided the legal framework for Germany’s systematic persecution of Jews.

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The National Labor Relations Act 1935

The National Labor Relations Act 1935
The National Labor Relations Act 1935

The National Labor Relations Act 1935

President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed this bill, sometimes known as the Wagner Act, into law on July 5, 1935. It established the National Labor Interactions Board and addressed the issue of private-sector union-employer relations.

After the Supreme Court deemed the National Industrial Recovery Act unconstitutional, organized labor sought redress against companies who had been permitted to spy on, question, discipline, dismiss, and blacklist union members. Workers began to organize militantly in the 1930s, and a wave of strikes erupted across the country in the form of citywide general strikes and plant takeovers in 1933 and 1934. Workers attempting to organize unions clashed violently with police and private security forces supporting the interests of anti-union companies.

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The Securities Exchange Act 1934

The Securities Exchange Act 1934
The Securities Exchange Act 1934

The Securities Exchange Act 1934

The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (SEA) was enacted to regulate securities transactions after they were issued, assuring better financial openness and accuracy, as well as reduced fraud and manipulation.

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the SEA’s regulatory arm, was established by the SEA. The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) regulates securities, including stocks, bonds, and over-the-counter securities, as well as markets and financial professionals such as brokers, dealers, and investment advisors. It also keeps track of the financial disclosures that publicly traded corporations must provide.

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The Federal Communications Act 1934

The Federal Communications Act 1934
The Federal Communications Act 1934

The Federal Communications Act 1934

Background
The 1934 Communications Act consolidated and organized federal regulation of telephone, telegraph, and radio communications. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) was established by the Act to monitor and regulate these industries. The Act is revised on a regular basis to include regulations that control emerging communications technologies like broadcast, cable, and satellite television.

General Provisions
The Communications Act of 1934, as modified, is a broad statute that governs telephone, telegraph, television, and radio communications in the United States. Its seven subchapters control practically every aspect of the communications and broadcasting industries, including frequency assignment, rates and fees, standards, competition, subscriber access terms, commercials, public service programming, and government use of communications infrastructure. The Act also establishes the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to offer more extensive regulation and monitoring.

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The Repeal of Prohibition 1933

The Repeal of Prohibition 1933
The Repeal of Prohibition 1933

The Repeal of Prohibition 1933

Many Americans were disillusioned by 1929, following nine years of Prohibition. People had been publicly drinking illegal alcoholic beverages that were readily available practically everywhere for a long time. They studied news reports of assassinations and explosions in major cities, carried out by organized crime members who had made a fortune by bootlegging whiskey, wine, and beer and transporting it by land, sea, and air.

On February 14, 1929, in Chicago, Al Capone’s henchmen lined up and killed down seven companions of rival mobster George “Bugs” Moran in the “St. Valentine’s Day Massacre,” as it was dubbed by the press. The news of the heinous mass murder horrified the country, even Prohibition supporters. Meanwhile, Capone organized press conferences and attended public athletic events dressed in fancy outfits. He was making anywhere from $60 million to $100 million a year from bootlegging while also bribing cops, judges, and politicians with cash.

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Censorship and Ulysses 1933

Censorship and Ulysses 1933
Censorship and Ulysses 1933

Censorship and Ulysses 1933

A US court found James Joyce’s Ulysses, one of the most influential novels of the twentieth century, obscene while it was serialized in the American literary magazine The Little Review from 1918 to 1920.

Sylvia Beach’s Shakespeare and Company released the novel in book form in Paris in 1922, describing a day in the life of Leopold Bloom.

New York court ruled Ulysses was obscene, fined magazine for publication

The secretary of the New York Society for the Suppression of Vice filed a complaint in 1920 after the publication of the “Nausicaa” episode, which contains a depiction of Bloom masturbating, and the post office delayed mailing of The Little Review pending a court ruling.

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