The Child Labor Act of 1916 US

The Child Labor Act of 1916 US

The Child Labor Act of 1916 US
The Child Labor Act of 1916 US

This law set limits on children’s working hours and prohibited the interstate sale of commodities made with child labor.

Approximately 2 million youngsters worked in mills, mines, farms, factories, stores, and on city streets across the United States, according to the 1900 census. The census data sparked a nationwide push in the United States to abolish child labor.

Lewis Hine was engaged as a staff photographer by the National Child Labor Committee in 1908, and he was dispatched around the country to photograph and report on child labor (see Hine photo). Because of its negative impact on children’s health and wellbeing, social reformers began to denounce child labor.

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The Prohibition of Illegal Narcotics 1915

The Prohibition of Illegal Narcotics 1915

The Prohibition of Illegal Narcotics 1915
USA or American flag background

Francis Burton Harrison (1873–1957)

Morphine (an opium derivative and relative of heroin) was discovered to have pain-killing qualities during the Civil War and quickly became the major component in numerous patent medications.

Marijuana and cocaine were used to cure migraines, rheumatism, and sleeplessness in the late 1800s, while cocaine was used to treat sinusitis, hay fever, and chronic exhaustion in the late 1800s. All of these narcotics were also used recreationally, with cocaine being a regular ingredient in wines and soda pop, notably the well-known Coca-Cola.

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The Clayton Antitrust Act 1914

The Clayton Antitrust Act 1914

The Clayton Antitrust Act 1914
This 1905 illustration shows John D. Rockefeller of Standard Oil prompting U.S. Senator Nelson Aldrich to play Congress like an organ.
The Clayton Antitrust Act 1914

Woodrow Wilson (1856–1924)

The Clayton Antitrust Act was passed by Congress in 1914 to clarify and enhance the Sherman Antitrust Act (1890). Large firms were able to take advantage of several loopholes in the latter’s imprecise language, allowing them to engage in certain restrictive business arrangements that, although not unlawful in and of themselves, resulted in concentrations that harmed competition.

Despite the trust-busting actions of Presidents Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft under the Sherman Act, it appeared to a legislative committee in 1913 that big business had continued to grow bigger and that a few persons had the capacity to throw the country into a financial crisis. When President Woodrow Wilson requested a major overhaul of existing antitrust laws, Congress reacted by establishing the Clayton Act.

The Clayton Act made unlawful some commercial activities that are favorable to the establishment of monopolies or that result from them, whereas the Sherman Act merely made monopolies illegal.

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The Exclusionary Rule 1914 US

The Exclusionary Rule 1914 US

The Exclusionary Rule 1914 US
Justice Benjamin Cardozo famously got at the heart of the debate over the exclusionary rule: whether “the criminal is to go free because the constable has blundered.” He found the rule inapplicable in the case he was deciding. The Exclusionary Rule 1914 US

“The right of the people to be secure in their bodies, homes, documents, and possessions against arbitrary searches and seizures must not be infringed,” according to the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution. More than two centuries later, courts are still debating how to interpret and apply those words.

The question that Judge Benjamin Cardozo posed in his 1926 New York Court of Appeals judgment in People v. Defore remains at the core of the debate: Should the criminal walk free because the policeman made a mistake? In general, courts have said yes, citing the exclusionary rule, which prevents evidence obtained illegally from being used in criminal prosecutions.

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The Federal Reserve Act 1913 US

The Federal Reserve Act 1913 US

The Federal Reserve Act 1913 US
The Federal Reserve System was created in response to a series of financial panics. It now oversees and regulates the nation’s financial system, including the supply of money printed by the Treasury Department.
The Federal Reserve Act 1913 US

What Is the 1913 Federal Reserve Act?

The Federal Reserve Act of 1913 established the Federal Reserve System in the United States.

The Federal Reserve Act was created by Congress in order to maintain economic stability in the United States by establishing a central bank to manage monetary policy.

The Federal Reserve Act of 1913 established the Federal Reserve System in the United States.

The Federal Reserve Act was created by Congress in order to maintain economic stability in the United States by establishing a central bank to manage monetary policy.

IMPORTANT TAKEAWAYS

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The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire 1911

The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire 1911

The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire 1911
The New York Fire Department battles the great blaze at the Triangle shirtwaist factory in Greenwich Village on March 25, 1911.
The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire 1911

The Triangle Shirtwaist Company factory in New York City burnt down on March 25, 1911, killing 146 people. Because the killings were completely preventable–the majority of the victims perished as a consequence of disregarded safety features and closed doors within the manufacturing building–it is recognized as one of the most notorious tragedies in American industrial history. The incident drew global attention to the dangers of factory sweatshops, prompting the adoption of a number of rules and regulations to better safeguard employees’ safety.

Working Conditions in The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory

The Triangle factory was located on the top three floors of the Asch Building, on the junction of Greene Street and Washington Place in Manhattan, and was owned by Max Blanck and Isaac Harris. It was a veritable sweatshop, with young immigrant women working at sewing machines in a confined environment. Almost all of the employees were adolescent females who did not understand English and worked 12 hours a day, every day.

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Busting the Trusts 1911 The Statut

Busting the Trusts 1911 The Statut

Busting the Trusts 1911 The Statut
Busting the Trusts 1911 The Statut

There was a major surge of industrialisation across the United States in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The growth of “big business” was one of the era’s outcomes. Large firms arose in specific industries. By arranging themselves into monopolies, several of these firms were able to reduce or even eliminate competition. A trust was a technique of combining opposing businesses to organize a firm.

Trusts, according to progressive reformers, were harmful for the economy and for consumers. Trusts could charge any price they wanted since there was no competition. The pricing of things was set by corporate greed rather than market desires. Progressives pushed for legislation to dismantle these trusts, a practice known as “trust busting.”

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