Cameras in the Courts 1937, the US

Cameras in the Courts 1937, the US
Cameras in the Courts 1937, the US

Cameras in the Courts 1937, the US

Photographers lost their right to testify in court in the early 1930s as a result of a sensational trial, and it took them four decades to reclaim it. Bruno Hauptmann was on trial in New Jersey in 1934 for kidnapping and murdering the baby of famous aviator Charles A. Lindbergh and author Anne Morrow Lindbergh.

Nearly 700 reporters and photographers descended on the town. The trial judge allowed still photography, but was caught off guard by the bombardment of flashbulbs and the presence of a smuggled newsreel camera.

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FDR and the Court-Packing Plan 1937

FDR and the Court-Packing Plan 1937
The official portrait of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 1947. | FDR and the Court-Packing Plan 1937

FDR and the Court-Packing Plan 1937

President Franklin D. Roosevelt announces a plan to enlarge the Supreme Court to as many as 15 judges on February 5, 1937, ostensibly to make it more efficient. Critics quickly accused Roosevelt of attempting to “stuff” the Supreme Court in order to neutralize anti-New Deal justices.

Several significant sections of New Deal legislation had been struck down by the supreme court in the preceding two years on the grounds that they ceded an unconstitutional amount of power to the executive branch and the federal government. With his overwhelming reelection in 1936, President Roosevelt proposed in February 1937 to grant full salary retirement for all members of the Supreme Court over the age of 70.

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The Federal Register 1936, the US

The Federal Register 1936, the US
Construction of the National Archives and Records Administration building in Washington, D.C., nears completion in September 1934. Two years later, NARA began daily printing of the Federal Register. | The Federal Register 1936, the US

The Federal Register 1936, the US

Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882–1945)

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) and the Government Publishing Office print the Federal Register (FR or Fed. Reg.) every federal working day (GPO).  Proposed and finished administrative agency rules and regulations, as well as policy statements and interpretations of existing rules, are all included in each issue. The journal also publishes notices of public hearings, grant applications, and administrative decrees, as well as presidential documents (such as executive orders). It is utilized by government officials, attorneys, corporations, and anyone who are interested in the federal government’s everyday legal and administrative activity.

The Federal Register had a total of 2,620 pages in its initial year of publication, 1936. In 2017, however, 61,950 pages were added. The GPO stated in April 2018 that it had digitized every issue of the Federal Register published between 1936 and 1994, when the government began publishing the paper both digitally and in print. The Federal Register was digitized by the GPO in 14,587 daily issues, totaling approximately two million pages of text. These digital copies are now accessible through an online archive.

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The Social Security Act 1935

The Social Security Act 1935
The Social Security Act 1935

The Social Security Act 1935

The Social Security Act, which went into effect on August 14, 1935, provided a system of old-age benefits for workers, as well as payments for victims of industrial accidents, unemployment insurance, and assistance for dependent mothers and children, the blind, and the physically handicapped.

Prior to the 1930s, elderly care was mostly a municipal, state, and family affair (with the exception of veterans’ pensions). The immense hardship caused by the Great Depression, on the other hand, sparked popular support for a national old-age insurance scheme. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt issued a message to Congress on January 17, 1935, requesting “social security” legislation.

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The Nuremberg Laws 1935

The Nuremberg Laws 1935
The Nuremberg Laws 1935

The Nuremberg Laws 1935 – 15 September 1935

The Nuremberg Race Laws are passed by the German parliament (Reichstag).

The Reich Citizenship Law and the Law for the Protection of German Blood and German Honor were the two pieces of legislation that made up the Nuremberg Race Laws. Both regulations were passed during a special session of the Nazi-controlled Reichstag in Nuremberg, Germany. Many of the racial theories that underlay Nazi ideology were formalized through these laws, which also provided the legal framework for Germany’s systematic persecution of Jews.

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The National Labor Relations Act 1935

The National Labor Relations Act 1935
The National Labor Relations Act 1935

The National Labor Relations Act 1935

President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed this bill, sometimes known as the Wagner Act, into law on July 5, 1935. It established the National Labor Interactions Board and addressed the issue of private-sector union-employer relations.

After the Supreme Court deemed the National Industrial Recovery Act unconstitutional, organized labor sought redress against companies who had been permitted to spy on, question, discipline, dismiss, and blacklist union members. Workers began to organize militantly in the 1930s, and a wave of strikes erupted across the country in the form of citywide general strikes and plant takeovers in 1933 and 1934. Workers attempting to organize unions clashed violently with police and private security forces supporting the interests of anti-union companies.

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The Securities Exchange Act 1934

The Securities Exchange Act 1934
The Securities Exchange Act 1934

The Securities Exchange Act 1934

The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (SEA) was enacted to regulate securities transactions after they were issued, assuring better financial openness and accuracy, as well as reduced fraud and manipulation.

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the SEA’s regulatory arm, was established by the SEA. The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) regulates securities, including stocks, bonds, and over-the-counter securities, as well as markets and financial professionals such as brokers, dealers, and investment advisors. It also keeps track of the financial disclosures that publicly traded corporations must provide.

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