The Federal Reserve Act 1913 US

The Federal Reserve Act 1913 US

The Federal Reserve Act 1913 US
The Federal Reserve System was created in response to a series of financial panics. It now oversees and regulates the nation’s financial system, including the supply of money printed by the Treasury Department.
The Federal Reserve Act 1913 US

What Is the 1913 Federal Reserve Act?

The Federal Reserve Act of 1913 established the Federal Reserve System in the United States.

The Federal Reserve Act was created by Congress in order to maintain economic stability in the United States by establishing a central bank to manage monetary policy.

The Federal Reserve Act of 1913 established the Federal Reserve System in the United States.

The Federal Reserve Act was created by Congress in order to maintain economic stability in the United States by establishing a central bank to manage monetary policy.

IMPORTANT TAKEAWAYS

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The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire 1911

The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire 1911

The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire 1911
The New York Fire Department battles the great blaze at the Triangle shirtwaist factory in Greenwich Village on March 25, 1911.
The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire 1911

The Triangle Shirtwaist Company factory in New York City burnt down on March 25, 1911, killing 146 people. Because the killings were completely preventable–the majority of the victims perished as a consequence of disregarded safety features and closed doors within the manufacturing building–it is recognized as one of the most notorious tragedies in American industrial history. The incident drew global attention to the dangers of factory sweatshops, prompting the adoption of a number of rules and regulations to better safeguard employees’ safety.

Working Conditions in The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory

The Triangle factory was located on the top three floors of the Asch Building, on the junction of Greene Street and Washington Place in Manhattan, and was owned by Max Blanck and Isaac Harris. It was a veritable sweatshop, with young immigrant women working at sewing machines in a confined environment. Almost all of the employees were adolescent females who did not understand English and worked 12 hours a day, every day.

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Busting the Trusts 1911 The Statut

Busting the Trusts 1911 The Statut

Busting the Trusts 1911 The Statut
Busting the Trusts 1911 The Statut

There was a major surge of industrialisation across the United States in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The growth of “big business” was one of the era’s outcomes. Large firms arose in specific industries. By arranging themselves into monopolies, several of these firms were able to reduce or even eliminate competition. A trust was a technique of combining opposing businesses to organize a firm.

Trusts, according to progressive reformers, were harmful for the economy and for consumers. Trusts could charge any price they wanted since there was no competition. The pricing of things was set by corporate greed rather than market desires. Progressives pushed for legislation to dismantle these trusts, a practice known as “trust busting.”

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Workers’ Compensation Law 1910

Workers’ Compensation Law 1910

Workers’ Compensation Law 1910
Charles Evans Hughes as governor of New York.
Workers’ Compensation Law 1910

A Brief History of Workers’ Compensation Laws

You have the right to choose a workers’ compensation attorney in Baltimore regardless of the circumstances surrounding your job injuries. Your workers’ compensation attorney will fight for your right to get adequate medical care and benefits if the injuries that led to your claim are serious enough to permanently affect your lifestyle or capacity to work.

It’s a good idea to familiarize familiar with the regulations and history surrounding the workers’ compensation program before filing a claim.

Adoption in the United States

Germany is responsible for the existing workers’ compensation regime in the United States. In 1884, German Chancellor Otto von Bismarck introduced the first modern workers’ compensation legislation, known as Sickness and Accident Laws.

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The White-Slave Traffic Act 1910

The White-Slave Traffic Act 1910

The White-Slave Traffic Act 1910
The White-Slave Traffic Act 1910

The Mann Act of 1910 (also known as the White-Slave Traffic Act of 1910) makes it illegal to transport “any woman or girl for the purpose of prostitution or debauchery, or for any other immoral purpose.”

The Mann Act, named for Illinois Congressman James R. Mann, used the Trade Clause to make it illegal to transfer women for immoral reasons via interstate or international commerce. Prostitution, immorality, and human trafficking were all targets of the Act. In 1907, Congress established a commission to look into the subject of immigrant prostitutes. Foreign women were allegedly transported to America for sexual enslavement, and immigrant males allegedly recruited American girls into prostitution (also known as “white slavery”). The committees felt that unless a girl was drugged or held hostage, she would not enter prostitution. This sparked public anger, and the Mann Act was finally passed as a result.

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Congressional Power to Tax Income 1909

Congressional Power to Tax Income 1909

Congressional Power to Tax Income 1909
Congressional Power to Tax Income 1909

The 16th amendment, passed by Congress on July 2, 1909, and ratified on February 3, 1913, established Congress’s ability to levy a Federal income tax.

The income tax change, which has far-reaching social and economic implications, was enacted into law through a strange chain of events that culminated in a bungled political manoeuvre.

The first American income tax was enacted in 1861 in response to the financial demands of the Civil War. Congress first imposed a flat 3-percentage-point tax on all incomes above $800, but subsequently changed this premise to include a tiered tax. The income tax was repealed by Congress in 1872, but the notion remained.

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Women in Factories 1908: Muller v. Oregon

Women in Factories 1908: Muller v. Oregon

Women in Factories 1908: Muller v. Oregon
Women in Factories 1908: Muller v. Oregon

Muller v. State of Oregon

Muller v. State of Oregon, a 1908 U.S. Supreme Court case that, although appearing to support the health and welfare of female employees, actually resulted in extra protective legislation that was destructive to workplace equality for years. The issue was a 1903 Oregon legislation prohibiting women from working more than 10 hours in a single day. Curt Muller, the proprietor of a laundry, was fined $10 in 1905 for allowing a supervisor to force Mrs. E. Gotcher to work more than 10 hours.

Muller’s counsel, William D. Fenton, argued in front of the United States Supreme Court that the Act violated Mrs. Gotcher’s Fourteenth Amendment right to due process by prohibiting her from freely contracting with her employer. However, the state’s counsel, Louis D. Brandeis, opted to argue that because of their bodily differences from males, women need “particular protection.”

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