New York State Legalizes Boxing 1920

New York State Legalizes Boxing 1920
A zoopraxiscope, c. 1893, created by English motion-picture pioneer Eadweard Muybridge (1830–1904), shows two athletes boxing. | New York State Legalizes Boxing 1920

New York State Legalizes Boxing 1920

The Walker Law, adopted in the state of New York under the leadership of James J. Walker, the state senate speaker, was the first significant U.S. legislation concerning the sport of boxing. The bill made professional boxing legal in New York, and its set of boxing regulations, largely drafted by William Gavin, an English promoter, served as a model for similar legislation in other states. The New York State Athletic Commission was also founded under the statute, which has remained autonomous and continues to publish its own list of world boxing champions.

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19th Amendment: Women’s Right to Vote (1920)

19th Amendment: Women's Right to Vote (1920)
The cover of the program from a women’s suffrage procession in Washington, D.C., on March 3, 1913. | 19th Amendment: Women’s Right to Vote (1920)

19th Amendment: Women’s Right to Vote (1920)

The 19th amendment, passed by Congress on June 4, 1919, and ratified on August 18, 1920, gave women the right to vote.

The 19th Amendment provides women in the United States the right to vote. This achievement came after a long and arduous struggle—victory came after decades of agitation and resistance. Several generations of women’s suffrage supporters spoke, wrote, marched, lobbied, and engaged in civil disobedience beginning in the mid-nineteenth century to obtain what many Americans considered a radical amendment in the Constitution. Only a small percentage of early supporters lived to see the final victory in 1920.

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