The Repeal of Prohibition 1933

The Repeal of Prohibition 1933
The Repeal of Prohibition 1933

The Repeal of Prohibition 1933

Many Americans were disillusioned by 1929, following nine years of Prohibition. People had been publicly drinking illegal alcoholic beverages that were readily available practically everywhere for a long time. They studied news reports of assassinations and explosions in major cities, carried out by organized crime members who had made a fortune by bootlegging whiskey, wine, and beer and transporting it by land, sea, and air.

On February 14, 1929, in Chicago, Al Capone’s henchmen lined up and killed down seven companions of rival mobster George “Bugs” Moran in the “St. Valentine’s Day Massacre,” as it was dubbed by the press. The news of the heinous mass murder horrified the country, even Prohibition supporters. Meanwhile, Capone organized press conferences and attended public athletic events dressed in fancy outfits. He was making anywhere from $60 million to $100 million a year from bootlegging while also bribing cops, judges, and politicians with cash.

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Censorship and Ulysses 1933

Censorship and Ulysses 1933
Censorship and Ulysses 1933

Censorship and Ulysses 1933

A US court found James Joyce’s Ulysses, one of the most influential novels of the twentieth century, obscene while it was serialized in the American literary magazine The Little Review from 1918 to 1920.

Sylvia Beach’s Shakespeare and Company released the novel in book form in Paris in 1922, describing a day in the life of Leopold Bloom.

New York court ruled Ulysses was obscene, fined magazine for publication

The secretary of the New York Society for the Suppression of Vice filed a complaint in 1920 after the publication of the “Nausicaa” episode, which contains a depiction of Bloom masturbating, and the post office delayed mailing of The Little Review pending a court ruling.

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Wall Street Regulation 1933

Wall Street Regulation 1933
Wall Street Regulation 1933

Wall Street Regulation 1933

The Glass-Steagall Act was enacted as part of the Banking Act of 1933 by the United States Congress. Senator Carter Glass, a former Treasury Secretary, and Representative Henry Steagall, chair of the House Banking and Currency Committee, co-sponsored the bill, which forbade commercial banks from engaging in investment banking and vice versa.

During the Great Depression, an emergency procedure was implemented to prevent the failure of nearly 5,000 banks. Glass-effectiveness Steagall’s waned over time, and it was largely repealed in 1999. However, a new financial crisis in the twenty-first century has prompted discussions in political and economic circles about renewing the act.

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Hitler’s Rise to Power 1933

Hitler’s Rise to Power 1933
Hitler’s Rise to Power 1933

Hitler’s Rise to Power 1933

Paul von Hindenburg (1847–1934), Adolf Hitler (1889–1945)

Hitler ascended to power in 1933 and established a dictatorship in Germany. How did Hitler’s Nazi party gain power, and how did he remove his opponents?

The weakness of the Weimar republic after WWI

In 1919, Germany became a republic. Kaiser Wilhelm II abdicated after losing the First World War. The new arrangement displeased a large number of Germans. They yearned to be back in the Empire. Many individuals thought the ruling social democrats were to responsible for the war’s failure. Nonetheless, from the mid-1920s onwards, things began to improve. The global economic crisis struck in 1930.

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