The Securities Exchange Act 1934

The Securities Exchange Act 1934
The Securities Exchange Act 1934

The Securities Exchange Act 1934

The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (SEA) was enacted to regulate securities transactions after they were issued, assuring better financial openness and accuracy, as well as reduced fraud and manipulation.

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the SEA’s regulatory arm, was established by the SEA. The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) regulates securities, including stocks, bonds, and over-the-counter securities, as well as markets and financial professionals such as brokers, dealers, and investment advisors. It also keeps track of the financial disclosures that publicly traded corporations must provide.

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The Federal Communications Act 1934

The Federal Communications Act 1934
The Federal Communications Act 1934

The Federal Communications Act 1934

Background
The 1934 Communications Act consolidated and organized federal regulation of telephone, telegraph, and radio communications. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) was established by the Act to monitor and regulate these industries. The Act is revised on a regular basis to include regulations that control emerging communications technologies like broadcast, cable, and satellite television.

General Provisions
The Communications Act of 1934, as modified, is a broad statute that governs telephone, telegraph, television, and radio communications in the United States. Its seven subchapters control practically every aspect of the communications and broadcasting industries, including frequency assignment, rates and fees, standards, competition, subscriber access terms, commercials, public service programming, and government use of communications infrastructure. The Act also establishes the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to offer more extensive regulation and monitoring.

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