The Social Security Act 1935

The Social Security Act 1935
The Social Security Act 1935

The Social Security Act 1935

The Social Security Act, which went into effect on August 14, 1935, provided a system of old-age benefits for workers, as well as payments for victims of industrial accidents, unemployment insurance, and assistance for dependent mothers and children, the blind, and the physically handicapped.

Prior to the 1930s, elderly care was mostly a municipal, state, and family affair (with the exception of veterans’ pensions). The immense hardship caused by the Great Depression, on the other hand, sparked popular support for a national old-age insurance scheme. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt issued a message to Congress on January 17, 1935, requesting “social security” legislation.

Read more

The Nuremberg Laws 1935

The Nuremberg Laws 1935
The Nuremberg Laws 1935

The Nuremberg Laws 1935 – 15 September 1935

The Nuremberg Race Laws are passed by the German parliament (Reichstag).

The Reich Citizenship Law and the Law for the Protection of German Blood and German Honor were the two pieces of legislation that made up the Nuremberg Race Laws. Both regulations were passed during a special session of the Nazi-controlled Reichstag in Nuremberg, Germany. Many of the racial theories that underlay Nazi ideology were formalized through these laws, which also provided the legal framework for Germany’s systematic persecution of Jews.

Read more

The National Labor Relations Act 1935

The National Labor Relations Act 1935
The National Labor Relations Act 1935

The National Labor Relations Act 1935

President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed this bill, sometimes known as the Wagner Act, into law on July 5, 1935. It established the National Labor Interactions Board and addressed the issue of private-sector union-employer relations.

After the Supreme Court deemed the National Industrial Recovery Act unconstitutional, organized labor sought redress against companies who had been permitted to spy on, question, discipline, dismiss, and blacklist union members. Workers began to organize militantly in the 1930s, and a wave of strikes erupted across the country in the form of citywide general strikes and plant takeovers in 1933 and 1934. Workers attempting to organize unions clashed violently with police and private security forces supporting the interests of anti-union companies.

Read more