The Federal Register 1936, the US

The Federal Register 1936, the US
Construction of the National Archives and Records Administration building in Washington, D.C., nears completion in September 1934. Two years later, NARA began daily printing of the Federal Register. | The Federal Register 1936, the US

The Federal Register 1936, the US

Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882–1945)

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) and the Government Publishing Office print the Federal Register (FR or Fed. Reg.) every federal working day (GPO).  Proposed and finished administrative agency rules and regulations, as well as policy statements and interpretations of existing rules, are all included in each issue. The journal also publishes notices of public hearings, grant applications, and administrative decrees, as well as presidential documents (such as executive orders). It is utilized by government officials, attorneys, corporations, and anyone who are interested in the federal government’s everyday legal and administrative activity.

The Federal Register had a total of 2,620 pages in its initial year of publication, 1936. In 2017, however, 61,950 pages were added. The GPO stated in April 2018 that it had digitized every issue of the Federal Register published between 1936 and 1994, when the government began publishing the paper both digitally and in print. The Federal Register was digitized by the GPO in 14,587 daily issues, totaling approximately two million pages of text. These digital copies are now accessible through an online archive.

Read more

The Social Security Act 1935

The Social Security Act 1935
The Social Security Act 1935

The Social Security Act 1935

The Social Security Act, which went into effect on August 14, 1935, provided a system of old-age benefits for workers, as well as payments for victims of industrial accidents, unemployment insurance, and assistance for dependent mothers and children, the blind, and the physically handicapped.

Prior to the 1930s, elderly care was mostly a municipal, state, and family affair (with the exception of veterans’ pensions). The immense hardship caused by the Great Depression, on the other hand, sparked popular support for a national old-age insurance scheme. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt issued a message to Congress on January 17, 1935, requesting “social security” legislation.

Read more