Bushel’s Case 1670 – Landmark Ruling on the Role of Jurors

Bushel’s Case 1670 – Landmark Ruling on the Role of Jurors

Bushel’s Case 1670 - Landmark Ruling on the Role of Jurors - The Birth of Pennsylvania 1680 by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris (1863–1930) shows King Charles II giving a land charter to William Penn in the Palace of Whitehall.
Bushel’s Case 1670 – Landmark Ruling on the Role of Jurors – The Birth of Pennsylvania 1680 by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris (1863–1930) shows King Charles II giving a land charter to William Penn in the Palace of Whitehall.

King v. Penn and Mead, William Penn (1644–1718), John Vaughan (1603–1674)

A court is only as sound as its jury, and a jury is only as sound as the men who make it up.

—Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

In August 1670, William Penn and William Mead were charged with “unlawfully and tumultuously” assembling to preach and speak during a Quaker worship session on London’s Gracechurch Street. William Penn, who later founded the Colony and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and William Mead were charged with “unlawfully and tumultuously” assembling to preach and speak during a Quaker worship session on London’s Gracechurch Street. The jury found Mead not guilty and Penn convicted at the conclusion of King V. Penn and Mead at the Old Bailey (the Central Criminal Court of England and Wales).

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