Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938

Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938
Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) applies to the majority of employers. It applies to government organizations and businesses that engage in interstate commerce or provide products and services to businesses. The FLSA establishes standards for employment status, child labor, minimum wage, overtime pay, and record-keeping. It determines who is exempt from the Act (and so not covered by it) and who is not (covered by the Act). When minors are allowed to work, it imposes wage and time limits. It establishes the minimum salary and specifies when overtime must be paid.

The United States Department of Labor is responsible for enforcing the Fair Labor Standards Act. Employers who violate the Act knowingly or repeatedly may face fines of up to $10,000 per infringement. Convictions for the second time might result in a fine of $10,000 and/or a 6-month sentence.

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