The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire 1911

The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire 1911

The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire 1911
The New York Fire Department battles the great blaze at the Triangle shirtwaist factory in Greenwich Village on March 25, 1911.
The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire 1911

The Triangle Shirtwaist Company factory in New York City burnt down on March 25, 1911, killing 146 people. Because the killings were completely preventable–the majority of the victims perished as a consequence of disregarded safety features and closed doors within the manufacturing building–it is recognized as one of the most notorious tragedies in American industrial history. The incident drew global attention to the dangers of factory sweatshops, prompting the adoption of a number of rules and regulations to better safeguard employees’ safety.

Working Conditions in The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory

The Triangle factory was located on the top three floors of the Asch Building, on the junction of Greene Street and Washington Place in Manhattan, and was owned by Max Blanck and Isaac Harris. It was a veritable sweatshop, with young immigrant women working at sewing machines in a confined environment. Almost all of the employees were adolescent females who did not understand English and worked 12 hours a day, every day.

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