The Servicemen’s Readjustment Act 1944

The Servicemen’s Readjustment Act 1944
The Servicemen’s Readjustment Act 1944 – President Roosevelt signs the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944 into law.

The Servicemen’s Readjustment Act, G.I. Bill 1944

This act, often known as the GI Bill, was signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on June 22, 1944, and gave payments to veterans of World War II for college education, unemployment insurance, and housing.

While World War II was still being waged, the Department of Labor predicted that 15 million men and women who had served in the military would be unemployed after the war. To prevent widespread unemployment from causing postwar depression, the National Resources Planning Board, a White House department, began studying postwar labor needs in 1942 and recommended a series of education and training initiatives in June 1943.

The fundamental components of what became the Serviceman’s Readjustment Act were created by the American Legion and pushed through Congress. In the spring of 1944, the bill was unanimously passed by both chambers of Congress. It was signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on June 22, 1944, just days after the D-day invasion of Normandy.

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